Flemish voiceover

Belgium has three official languages, which are in order of the native speaking population of Belgium: Dutch, French and German. A number of non-official minority languages are spoken as well. As no census exists, there are no official statistical data regarding the distribution or usage of Belgium’s three official languages or their dialects.  However, various…

BrusselsBelgium has three official languages, which are in order of the native speaking population of Belgium: Dutch, French and German. A number of non-official minority languages are spoken as well. As no census exists, there are no official statistical data regarding the distribution or usage of Belgium’s three official languages or their dialects.  However, various criteria, including the language(s) of parents, of education, or the second-language status of foreign born, may provide suggested figures. An estimated 59% of the Belgian population speaks Dutch (often colloquially referred to as “Flemish”), and 40% of the population speaks French; (the speakers are often colloquially referred to as “Walloon”).

Total Dutch speakers are 6.23 million, concentrated in the northern Flanders region, while French speakers comprise 3.32 million in Wallonia and an estimated 870,000 (or 85% ) in the officially bilingual Brussels-Capital Region. The German-speaking Community is made up of 73,000 people in the east of the Walloon Region; around 10,000 German and 60,000 Belgian nationals are speakers of German. Roughly 23,000 more German speakers live in municipalities near the official Community.

Both Belgian Dutch and Belgian French have minor differences in vocabulary and semantic nuances from the varieties spoken respectively in the Netherlands and France. Many Flemish people still speak dialects of Dutch in their local environment. Walloon, once the main regional language of Wallonia, is now only understood and spoken occasionally, mostly by elderly people. Wallonia’s dialects, along with those of Picard, are not used in public life and have been replaced by French.

fonte: Wikipedia

Since Belgium is a multilingual country, films are shown in Dutch and French. The range of French dubbed versions is approximately as wide as the German range where practically all films and TV-series are dubbed. Sometimes separate versions are recorded in the Netherlands and in Flanders; for instance several Walt Disney films or Harry Potter films. These dubbed versions only differ from each other in using different voice actors and different pronunciation while the text is almost the same. In general, movies shown by Flemish broadcasters are always shown in original language with subtitles, with the exception of movies for a young audience.
In this video, Mrs. Weasley was dubbed by professional Flemish voiceover voice artist who is part of Intervoices team.

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